Five years of out-takes

To celebrate five years of doing video-related things with cars, someone suggested I put together an out-take reel.

In the digital world it’s a case of make a fool of yourself, or have others make a fool of you, so we’ve plumped for the latter and I’ve agreed to make a fool of myself.

 

Behold what happens when car reviews go wrong.

 

 

Of course, if you want to follow the real NikkiDrives series, (without the embarrasing out-takes) you can do that at www.nikkidrives.tv.

 

2 Comments

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  1. The actual whoselale value placed on the car by the dealer (they will almost NEVER tell you this number) will be within pocket change regardless of what dealership you go to. What really matters is your negotiating skills vs the sales staff’s skills. (They will win most of the time unless you are an experienced negotiator in your own right.) The next factor will be how much “wiggle room” exists in the vehicle that you are buying. If you are looking at a new compact at a Chrysler dealer and a new mid-sized Ford there will be more bargaining room at the Ford house so it may appear that they are offering you more on your trade. They really are not, they’re just shifting the numbers around to make it appear that way.The best way to buy a new car is to sell your old one privately for cash. You’ll ALWAYS get more money on a private sale than a dealer will allow whoselale on a trade. If you insist on trading in, say for convenience sake, bargain on the new vehicle as if you were a cash buyer who is NOT trading in a car. Once you have a firm deal signed by management, bring up your trade. Don’t let them mess with the selling price on the new car after that point. What they are offering you on your trade is something close to the true whoselale value. That number should be very close no matter what dealership you are at.Watch out for one trick that I’ve seen a lot of lately. Dealers will show you the Black Book whoselale price and claim that that’s all that it’s worth. What they are showing you however is the pricing for vehicle AUCTIONS. Auction pricing is always less than whoselale because the buyers are not permitted to do much more than look over the cars and listen to the engine running. They can’t drive them or put them on a lift for a close evaluation. Insist that they use the NADA whoselale dealer guide pricing which will always be higher. That’s fair because they have had a chance to carefully inspect your car, unlike when they buy at auction.

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  2. Hi Anthony I was looking on auto taderr and came across a 1954 mercedes 300sl for 25k could that be right also do you ever come across race cars at the auctionsJohn collins’ brother Mark Miner thanks

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